Anal Warts

No. Surgical treatment of anal warts is usually performed as outpatient surgery.

Most people are moderately uncomfortable for a few days after treatment, and pain medication may be prescribed. Depending on the extent of the disease, some people return to work the next day, while others may remain out of work for several days.

Recurrent warts are common. The virus that causes the warts can live concealed in tissues that appear normal for several months before another wart develops. As new warts develop, they usually can be treated in the physician's office. Sometimes new warts develop so ­rapidly that office treatment  would be quite uncomfortable. In these situations, a second and occasionally third outpatient surgical visit may be recommended.

Follow-up visits are necessary at frequent intervals for several months after the last wart is observed to be certain that no new warts occur.

In some cases, warts may recur repeatedly after successful removal, since the virus that causes the warts often persists in a dormant state in body tissues. Discuss with you physician how often you should be evaluated for recurrent warts. Abstain from sexual contact with individuals who have anal (or genital) warts. Since many individuals may be unaware that they suffer from this condition, sexual abstinence, condom protection or limiting sexual contact to single partner will reduce your potential exposure to the contagious virus that causes these warts. As a precaution, sexual partners ought to be checked, even if they have no symptoms.

© 2008 American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons